Image

Image

Image

CUSTOM WORK

Commissioned Paintings
Custom or special events photography
Graphic Design Work
Brochures, Ad Spreads, Etc

PRICING FOR COMMISSIONED WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS / PORTRAITS
Prices start at $425 and are based on size, number of subjects, background details, and other factors. When you call or e-mail, I will discuss with you the complete process and be able to quote you a detailed price based on your individual needs and expectations.

PRICING FOR ORIGINAL ART
The paintings shown in the  WATERCOLOR GALLERIES are not commissioned paintings and can be purchased. Simply send me an e-mail with the title of the painting you are interested in and I will let you know availability and cost. Most paintings are framed and can be purchased with or without the existing frame.

I am happy to give you a quote on having your custom work done if you will fill out the request for quotation form.

**Cost estimates do not include framing. See FRAMING below.

FRAMING
Framing is not included in the cost of a commissioned portrait. I would be happy to have your portrait framed for you. Framing costs vary greatly depending on the frame selected and the size of the portrait. When framing a watercolor portrait, I always select acid-free mats and conservation glass. (Conservation glass has a UV-protective coating that protects the painting from fading.) Your portrait will be a piece of family history. It's important to frame it correctly to make it last.


The form below is for clients to send payments of an unspecified amount. This payment option is used for a custom project or commissioned work. Please enter an amount into the form below to make a payment.

Enter Amount:

Payents Through Paypal

Payment Comments:





Image

COMMISSION PROCEDURE

Many people are unfamiliar with how to commission a portrait, and therefore anxious about the procedure, costs and end results. Most are surprised at how enjoyable and easy it actually is to commission a portrait. Because a good portrait takes time to plan and create, you should expect it to take about a month or more for completion. Below is an outline of the commissioning process.

Step 1: Planning
The planning stage is one of the most important because it is here that we gather information, get to know each other and discuss your expectations. Together we will develop a direction for the painting, a time table and costs. There should be no surprises when you receive your finished portrait.

Step 2: Photography
A good-quality photo is very important. (See Photography Tips below.) I can't stress that enough. If the image is blurry or small, the portrait will not be successful. If possible, I will take my own photographs of the subject in order to have plenty of reference material to work with. The photography session is included in the cost of the portrait and generally takes place in the home of the individual, where they are most comfortable.

Step 3: The Drawing and Painting
The final step is planning the composition and the painting process. I work with the photographs that I have to come up with a composition that I feel will be pleasing and will send you a preliminary draft for approval before I begin the painting. The painting can take anywhere from a week to a month to complete depending on its size and complexity. Upon completion, you can decide on framing and matting options. For long-distant clients, I will send the draft via email.

PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS 

A good photograph is very important to the success of your portrait. Occasionally, it may not be possible for me to take the photographs. If you have to take your own, these tips may help:  

  1. Ditch the flash! A flash can flatten features and eliminate necessary shadows. Instead, use natural light and take photos near a bright window, on a covered porch or under a tree. An overcast day also works well.
  2. Take lots of photos. It's better to have too many good photos than to have to reshoot from scratch. Take close-up and full-body photos of the same pose to make sure you have enough detail.
  3. Casual, candid photos make more interesting portraits than posed shots with big smiles. Big smiles make the eyes squint.
  4. For pets, try to get down to their eye level. By getting down to their level, you capture more details in the eyes and face.
  5. Don't skimp! If using a digital camera, it's best to use a 4 mega-pixel camera or higher for better resolution

 

CONTACT
I can be reached at joy@joyskinner.com or
928-282-1915. I look forward to hearing from you!



Image

Image

Image